Panteleimon "Paddy" Ekkekakis, Ph.D.
PUBLICATIONS
"Psychobiology of Physical Activity" "Measurement of Affect, Mood, and Emotion" "Routledge Handbook of Physical Activity and Mental Health"
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    Book Chapters |  Journal Articles |  Conference Proceedings ]

    Book Chapters

  1. Ekkekakis, P., Hartman, M.E., & Ladwig, M.A. (in press). Affective responses to exercise. In G. Tenenbaum & R.C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of sport psychology (4th ed.). New York: Wiley.

  2. Ekkekakis, P., Ladwig, M.A., & Hartman, M.E. (in press). Research methods and issues in the field of physical activity and mental health. In S.R Bird & J.A. Hawley (Eds.), Research methods in physical activity and health. New York: Routledge.

  3. Ekkekakis, P., Hartman, M.E., & Ladwig, M.A. (in press). Conceptual foundations of exercise psychology: Facilitators, inhibitors, and a roadmap towards establishing societal relevance. In M.H. Anshel (Ed.), Handbook of sport and exercise psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

  4. Ekkekakis, P., Zenko, Z., Ladwig, M.A., & Hartman, M.E. (in press). Affect as a potential determinant of physical activity and exercise: Critical appraisal of an emerging research field. In D.M. Williams, R.E. Rhodes, & M. Conner (Eds.), Affective determinants of health behavior. New York: Oxford University Press.

  5. Ekkekakis, P. (in press). Physical activity and mental health in the era of evidence-based medicine. In T.S. Horn & A.L. Smith (Eds.), Advances in sport and exercise psychology (4th ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

  6. Ekkekakis, P., Zenko, Z., & Werstein, K.M. (2018). Exercise in obesity from the perspective of hedonic theory: A call for sweeping change in professional practice norms. In S. Razon & M.L. Sachs (Eds.), Applied exercise psychology: The challenging journey from motivation to adherence (pp. 289-315). New York: Routledge. [DOI] [Amz]

  7. Karageorghis, C.I., Ekkekakis, P., Bird, J.M., & Bigliassi, M. (2017). Music in the exercise and sport domain: Conceptual approaches and underlying mechanisms. In M. Leman, M. Lesaffre, & P.-J. Maes (Eds.), Routledge companion to embodied music interaction (pp. 284-293). New York: Routledge. [DOI] [Amz]

  8. Ekkekakis, P., & Zenko, Z. (2016). Measurement of affective responses to exercise: From "affectless arousal" to "the most well-characterized" relationship between the body and affect. In H.L. Meiselman (Ed.), Emotion measurement (pp. 299-321). Duxford, United Kingdom: Woodhead. [DOI] [Amz]

  9. Ekkekakis, P. & Zenko, Z. (2016). Escape from cognitivism: Exercise as hedonic experience. In M. Raab, P. Wylleman, R. Seiler, A.M. Elbe, & A. Hatzigeorgiadis (Eds.), Sport and exercise psychology research from theory to practice (pp. 389-414). London: Academic Press. [DOI] [Amz]

  10. Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Affect. In R.C. Eklund & G. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Encyclopedia of sport and exercise psychology (pp. 17-19). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [DOI] [Amz]

  11. Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Affective responses to exercise. In R.C. Eklund & G. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Encyclopedia of sport and exercise psychology (pp. 20-24). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [DOI] [Amz]

  12. Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Hedonic theory. In R.C. Eklund & G. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Encyclopedia of sport and exercise psychology (pp. 335-337). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [DOI] [Amz]

  13. Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Obesity. In R.C. Eklund & G. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Encyclopedia of sport and exercise psychology (pp. 508-510). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [DOI] [Amz]

  14. Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Pleasure. In R.C. Eklund & G. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Encyclopedia of sport and exercise psychology (pp. 543-544). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [DOI] [Amz]

  15. Hanin, J., & Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Emotions in sport and exercise settings. In A. Papaioannou & D. Hackfort (Eds.), Routledge companion to sport and exercise psychology: Global perspectives and fundamental concepts (pp. 83-104). New York: Routledge. [Amz] [Scholar]

  16. Ekkekakis, P., & Backhouse, S.H. (2014). Physical activity and feeling good. In A. Papaioannou & D. Hackfort (Eds.), Routledge companion to sport and exercise psychology: Global perspectives and fundamental concepts (pp. 687-704). New York: Routledge. [Amz]

  17. Ekkekakis, P. (2013). Physical activity as a mental health intervention in the era of managed care: A rationale. In P. Ekkekakis (Ed.), Routledge handbook of physical activity and mental health (pp. 1-32). New York: Routledge. [PDF] [Amz] [Scholar]

  18. Ekkekakis, P. (2013). Pleasure from the exercising body: Two centuries of changing outlooks in psychological thought. In P. Ekkekakis (Ed.), Routledge handbook of physical activity and mental health (pp. 35-56). New York: Routledge. [PDF] [Amz] [Scholar]

  19. Ekkekakis, P. (2013). Postscript. In P. Ekkekakis (Ed.), Routledge handbook of physical activity and mental health (pp. 556-558). New York: Routledge. [Amz]

  20. Ekkekakis, P. (2013). Redrawing the model of the exercising human in exercise prescriptions: From headless manikin to a creature with feelings! In J.M. Rippe (Ed.), Lifestyle medicine (2nd ed.; pp. 1421-1433). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. [PDF] [Amz] [Scholar]

  21. Ekkekakis, P., & Dafermos, M. (2012). Exercise is a many-splendored thing but for some it does not feel so splendid: Staging a resurgence of hedonistic ideas in the quest to understand exercise behavior. In E.O. Acevedo (Ed.), Oxford handbook of exercise psychology (pp. 295-333). New York: Oxford University Press. [PDF] [DOI] [Amz]

  22. Ekkekakis, P. (2012). The measurement of affect, mood, and emotion in exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum, R.C. Eklund, & A. Kamata (Eds.), Measurement in sport and exercise psychology (pp. 321-332). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. [PDF] [Amz]

  23. Ekkekakis, P., & Backhouse, S.H. (2009). Exercise and psychological well-being. In R. Maughan (Ed.), Olympic textbook of science in sport (pp. 251-271). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. [PDF] [DOI] [Amz] [Scholar]

  24. Acevedo, E.O., & Ekkekakis, P. (2006). Psychobiology of physical activity: Integration at last! In E.O. Acevedo & P. Ekkekakis (Eds.), Psychobiology of physical activity (pp. 1-14). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. [PDF] [Amz]

  25. Acevedo, E.O., & Ekkekakis, P. (2006). Psychobiology of physical activity: Future challenges in understanding human behavior. In E.O. Acevedo & P. Ekkekakis (Eds.), Psychobiology of physical activity (pp. 265-268). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. [Amz]

  26. Ekkekakis, P., & Acevedo, E.O. (2006). Affective responses to acute exercise: Toward a psychobiological dose-response model. In E.O. Acevedo & P. Ekkekakis (Eds.), Psychobiology of physical activity (pp. 91-109). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. [PDF] [Amz]

  27. Petruzzello, S.J., Ekkekakis, P., & Hall, E.E. (2006). Physical activity, affect, and electroencephalogram studies. In E.O. Acevedo & P. Ekkekakis (Eds.), Psychobiology of physical activity (pp. 111-128). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. [Amz]

  28. Biddle, S.J.H., & Ekkekakis, P. (2005). Physically active lifestyles and well-being. In F.A. Huppert, B. Keverne & N. Baylis (Eds.), The science of well-being (pp. 140-168). Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. [PDF] [Amz] [Scholar]

  29. Ekkekakis, P. (2005). The study of affective responses to acute exercise: The dual-mode model. In R. Stelter & K.K. Roessler (Eds.), New approaches to sport and exercise psychology (pp. 119-146). Oxford, United Kingdom: Meyer & Meyer Sport. [PDF] [Amz]

  30. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2002). Biofeedback in exercise psychology. In B. Blumenstein, M. Bar-Eli, & G. Tenenbaum (Eds.), Brain and body in sport and exercise: Biofeedback application in performance enhancement (pp. 77-100). Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons. [PDF] [Amz] [Scholar]

  31. Book Chapters |  Journal Articles |  Conference Proceedings ]

    Journal Articles

  32. Ekkekakis, P., Hartman, M.E., & Ladwig, M.A. (in press). Mass media representations of the evidence as a possible deterrent to recommending exercise for the treatment of depression: Lessons five years after the extraordinary case of TREAD-UK. Journal of Sports Sciences. [DOI] [PubMed]

  33. Brand, R., & Ekkekakis, P. (in press). Affective-reflective theory of physical inactivity and exercise: Foundations and preliminary evidence. German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research. [DOI]

  34. Ekkekakis, P., & Belvederi Murri, M. (2017). Exercise as antidepressant treatment: Time for the transition from trials to clinic? General Hospital Psychiatry, 49, A1-A5. [DOI] [PubMed]

  35. Ekkekakis, P. (2017). People have feelings! Exercise psychology in paradigmatic transition. Current Opinion in Psychology, 16, 84-88. [DOI] [PubMed]

  36. Ladwig, M.A., Hartman, M.E., & Ekkekakis, P. (2017). Affect-based exercise prescription: An idea whose time has come? ACSM's Health and Fitness Journal, 21 (5), 10-15. [DOI]

  37. Schuch, F.B., Morres, I.D., Ekkekakis, P., Rosenbaum, S., & Stubbs, B. (2017). Exercise works for depression: Bridging the implementation gap and making exercise a core component of treatment. Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 29 (2), 124-126. [DOI] [PubMed]

  38. Schuch, F.B., Morres, I.D., Ekkekakis, P., Rosenbaum, S., & Stubbs, B. (2017). A critical review on exercise as a treatment for clinically depressed adults. Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 29 (2), 65-71. [DOI] [PubMed]

  39. Decker, E.S., & Ekkekakis, P. (2017). More efficient, perhaps, but at what price? Pleasure and enjoyment responses to high-intensity interval exercise in low-active women with obesity. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 28, 1-10. [DOI] [Scholar]

  40. Zenko, Z., Ekkekakis, P., & Kavetsos, G. (2016). Changing minds? Bounded rationality and heuristic processes in exercise-related judgments and choices. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 5 (4), 337-351. [DOI] [Scholar]

  41. Zenko, Z., Ekkekakis, P., & Ariely, D. (2016). Can you have your vigorous exercise and enjoy it too? Ramping intensity down increases postexercise, remembered, and forecasted pleasure. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 38 (2), 149-159. [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  42. Ekkekakis, P., Vazou, S., Bixby, W.R., & Georgiadis, E. (2016). The mysterious case of the public health guideline that is (almost) entirely ignored: Call for a research agenda on the causes of the extreme avoidance of physical activity in obesity. Obesity Reviews, 17 (4), 313-329. [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  43. Ekkekakis, P., Albee, M.J., & Zenko, Z. (2016). Knowledge of exercise prescription guidelines across one four-year kinesiology curriculum. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87 (1), 124-130. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  44. Zenko, Z., & Ekkekakis, P. (2015). Knowledge of exercise prescription guidelines among certified exercise professionals. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 (5), 1422-1432. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  45. Smirmaul, B.P.C., Ekkekakis, P., Teixeira, I.P., Nakamura, P.M., & Kokubun, E. (2015). Preference for and Tolerance of the Intensity of Exercise Questionnaire: Brazilian Portuguese version. Brazilian Journal of Kinanthropometry and Human Performance, 17 (5), 550-564. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  46. Ekkekakis, P. (2015). Honey, I shrunk the pooled SMD! Guide to critical appraisal of systematic reviews and meta-analyses using the Cochrane review on exercise for depression as example. Mental Health and Physical Activity, 8 (1), 21-36. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  47. Jones, L., Karageorghis, C.I., & Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Can high-intensity exercise be more pleasant? Attentional dissociation using music and video. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 36 (5), 528-541. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  48. Hall, E.E., Petruzzello, S.J., Ekkekakis, P., Miller, P.C., & Bixby, W.R. (2014). The role of self-reported individual differences in preference for and tolerance of exercise intensity in fitness-testing performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28 (9), 2443-2451. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  49. Mackenzie, M., Carlson, L.E., Paskevich, D.M., Ekkekakis, P., Wurz, A.J., Wytsma, K., Krenz, K.A., McAuley, E., & Culos-Reed, N. (2014). Associations between attention, affect and cardiac activity in a single yoga session for female cancer survivors: An enactive neurophenomenology-based approach. Consciousness and Cognition, 27, 129-146. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  50. Mackenzie, M.J., Carlson, L.E., Ekkekakis, P., Paskevich, D.M., & Culos-Reed, S.N. (2013). Affect and mindfulness as moderators of change in mood disturbance, stress symptoms and quality of life in a community-based yoga program for cancer survivors. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013 (419496), 1-13. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  51. Ekkekakis, P., Hargreaves, E.A., & Parfitt, G. (2013). Introduction to special section on affective responses to exercise. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 14 (5), 749-750. [PDF] [DOI]

  52. Ekkekakis, P., Hargreaves, E.A., & Parfitt, G. (2013). Envisioning the next fifty years of research on the exercise-affect relationship. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 14 (5), 751-758. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  53. Ekkekakis, P., Parfitt, G., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2011). The pleasure and displeasure people feel when they exercise at different intensities: Decennial update and progress towards a tripartite rationale for exercise intensity prescription. Sports Medicine, 41 (8), 641-671. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  54. Holmes, M.E., Ekkekakis, P., & Eisenmann, J.C. (2010). The physical activity, stress, and metabolic syndrome triangle: A guide to unfamiliar territory for the obesity researcher. Obesity Reviews, 11 (7), 492-507. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  55. Franke, W.D., Kohut, M.L., Russell, D.W., Yoo, H.L., Ekkekakis, P., & Ramey, S.P. (2010). Is job-related stress the link between cardiovascular disease and the law enforcement profession? Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 52 (5), 561-565. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  56. Hall, E.E., Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2010). Predicting affective responses to exercise using resting EEG frontal asymmetry: Does intensity matter? Biological Psychology, 83 (3), 201-206. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  57. Ekkekakis, P., Lind, E., & Vazou, S. (2010). Affective responses to increasing levels of exercise intensity in normal-weight, overweight, and obese middle-aged women. Obesity, 18 (1), 79-85. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  58. Ekkekakis, P. (2009). Illuminating the black box: Investigating prefrontal cortical hemodynamics during exercise with near-infrared spectroscopy. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 31 (4), 505-553. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  59. Ekkekakis, P. (2009). The dual-mode theory of affective responses to exercise in metatheoretical context: II. Bodiless heads, ethereal cognitive schemata, and other improbable dualistic creatures, exercising. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2 (2), 139-160. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  60. Ekkekakis, P. (2009). The dual-mode theory of affective responses to exercise in metatheoretical context: I. Initial impetus, basic postulates, and philosophical framework. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2 (1), 73-94. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  61. Ekkekakis, P. (2009). Let them roam free? Physiological and psychological evidence for the potential of self-selected exercise intensity in public health. Sports Medicine, 39 (10), 857-888. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  62. Lind, E., Welch, A.S., & Ekkekakis, P. (2009). Do "mind over muscle" strategies work? Examining the effects of attentional association and dissociation on exertional, affective, and physiological responses to exercise. Sports Medicine, 39 (9), 743-764. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  63. Vazou-Ekkekakis, S., & Ekkekakis, P. (2009). Affective consequences of imposing the intensity of physical activity: Does the loss of perceived autonomy matter? Hellenic Journal of Psychology, 6 (2), 125-144. [PDF] [Scholar]

  64. Ekkekakis, P. (2008). The genetic tidal wave finally reached our shores: Will it be the catalyst for a critical overhaul of the way we think and do science? Mental Health and Physical Activity, 1 (2), 47-52. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  65. Smiley-Oyen, A.L., Lowry, K., Francoise, S., Kohut, M., & Ekkekakis, P. (2008). Exercise, fitness, and neurocognitive function in older adults: The "selective improvement" and "cardiovascular fitness" hypotheses. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 36 (3), 280-291. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  66. Ekkekakis, P. (2008). Affect circumplex redux: The discussion on its utility as a measurement framework in exercise psychology continues. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 1 (2), 139-159. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  67. Ekkekakis, P., Lind, E., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2008). Do regression-based computer algorithms for determining the ventilatory threshold agree? Journal of Sports Sciences, 26 (9), 967-976. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  68. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2008). The relationship between exercise intensity and affective responses demystified: To crack the forty-year-old nut, replace the forty-year-old nutcracker! Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 35 (2), 136-149. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  69. Holmes, M.E., Eisenmann, J.C., Ekkekakis, P., & Gentile, D. (2008). Physical activity, stress and the metabolic syndrome in 8-18 yr old boys. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 5 (2), 294-307. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  70. Ekkekakis, P., Thome, J., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2008). The Preference for and Tolerance of the Intensity of Exercise Questionnaire: A psychometric evaluation among college women. Journal of Sports Sciences, 26 (5), 499-510. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  71. Ekkekakis, P., Backhouse, S.H., Gray, C., & Lind, E. (2008). Walking is popular among adults but is it pleasant? A framework for clarifying the link between walking and affect as illustrated in two studies. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 9 (3) 246-264. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  72. Lind, E., Ekkekakis, P., & Vazou, S. (2008). The affective impact of exercise intensity that slightly exceeds the preferred level: "Pain" for no added "gain." Journal of Health Psychology, 13 (4), 464-468. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  73. Ekkekakis, P., Lind, E., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2007). Can self-reported tolerance of exercise intensity play a role in exercise testing? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39 (7), 1193-1199. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  74. Backhouse, S.H., Ekkekakis, P., Biddle, S.J.H., Foskett, A., & Williams, C. (2007). Exercise makes people feel better but people are inactive: Paradox or artifact? Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 29 (4), 498-517. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  75. Hall, E.E., Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2007). Regional brain activity and strenuous exercise: Predicting affective responses using EEG asymmetry. Biological Psychology, 75 (2), 194-200. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  76. Eisenmann, J.C., Ekkekakis, P., & Holmes, M. (2006). Sleep duration and overweight among children and adolescents. Acta Paediatrica, 95 (8), 956-963. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  77. Ekkekakis, P., & Lind, E. (2006). Exercise does not feel the same when you are overweight: The impact of self-selected and imposed intensity on affect and exertion. International Journal of Obesity, 30 (4), 652-660. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  78. Ekkekakis, P., Lind, E., & Joens-Matre, R.R. (2006). Can self-reported preference for exercise intensity predict physiologically defined self-selected exercise intensity? Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 77 (1), 81-90. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  79. Hall, E.E., Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2005). Is the relationship of perceived exertion to psychological factors intensity-dependent? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37 (8), 1365-1373. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  80. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2005). Some like it vigorous: Individual differences in the preference for and tolerance of exercise intensity. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27 (3), 350-374. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  81. Kohut, M.L., Lee, W., Martin, A., Arnston, B.A., Russell, D.W., Ekkekakis, P., Yoon, K.J., Bishop, A., & Cunnick, J.E. (2005). The exercise-induced enhancement of influenza immunity is mediated in part by improvements in psychosocial factors in older adults. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 19 (4), 357-366. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  82. Lind, E., Joens-Matre, R.R., & Ekkekakis, P. (2005). What intensity of physical activity do formerly sedentary middle-aged women select? Evidence of a coherent pattern from physiological, perceptual, and affective markers. Preventive Medicine, 40 (4), 407-419. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  83. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2005). Variation and homogeneity in affective responses to physical activity of varying intensities: An alternative perspective on dose-response based on evolutionary considerations. Journal of Sports Sciences, 23 (5), 477-500. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  84. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2005). Evaluation of the circumplex structure of the Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List before and after a short walk. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 6 (1), 83-101. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  85. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2004). Affective, but hardly effective: A response to Gauvin and Rejeski (2001). Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 5 (2), 135-152. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  86. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2004). Practical markers of the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism during exercise: Rationale and a case for affect-based exercise prescription. Preventive Medicine, 38 (2), 149-159. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  87. Ekkekakis, P. (2003). Pleasure and displeasure from the body: Perspectives from exercise. Cognition and Emotion, 17 (2), 213-239. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  88. Hall, E.E., Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2002). The affective beneficence of vigorous exercise revisited. British Journal of Health Psychology, 7 (1), 47-66. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  89. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2002). Analysis of the affect measurement conundrum in exercise psychology: IV. A conceptual case for the affect circumplex. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 3 (1), 35-63. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  90. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2001). Analysis of the affect measurement conundrum in exercise psychology: III. A conceptual and methodological critique of the Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2 (4), 205-232. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  91. Acevedo, E.O., & Ekkekakis, P. (2001). The transactional psychobiological nature of cognitive appraisal during exercise in environmentally stressful conditions. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2 (1), 47-67. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  92. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2001). Analysis of the affect measurement conundrum in exercise psychology: II. A conceptual and methodological critique of the Exercise-induced Feeling Inventory. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2 (1), 1-26. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  93. Petruzzello, S.J., Hall, E.E., & Ekkekakis, P. (2001). Regional brain activation as a biological marker of affective responsivity to acute exercise: Influence of fitness. Psychophysiology, 38 (1), 99-106. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  94. Van Landuyt, L.M., Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2000). Throwing the mountains into the lakes: On the perils of nomothetic conceptions of the exercise-affect relationship. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 22 (2), 208-234. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  95. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., Van Landuyt, L.M., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2000). Walking in (affective) circles: Can short walks enhance affect? Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23 (3), 245-275. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  96. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2000). Analysis of the affect measurement conundrum in exercise psychology: I. Fundamental issues. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 1 (2), 71-88. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  97. Hall, E.E., Ekkekakis, P., Van Landuyt, L.M., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2000). Resting frontal asymmetry predicts self-selected walking speed, but not affective responses to a short walk. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 71 (1), 74-79. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  98. Chow, J.W., Carlton, L.G., Ekkekakis, P., & Hay, J.G. (2000, January). A web-based video digitizing system for the study of projectile motion. The Physics Teacher, 38 (1), 37-40. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  99. Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (1999). Acute aerobic exercise and affect: Current status, problems, and prospects regarding dose-response. Sports Medicine, 28 (5), 337-374. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  100. Ekkekakis, P., Hall, E.E., & Petruzzello, S.J. (1999). Measuring state anxiety in the context of acute exercise using the State Anxiety Inventory: An attempt to resolve the brouhaha. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 21 (3), 205-229. [PDF] [DOI] [Scholar]

  101. Carlton, L.G., Chow, J.W., Ekkekakis, P., Shim, J., Ichiyama, R., & Carlton, M.J. (1999). A web-based digitized video image system for the study of motor coordination. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers, 31 (1), 57-62. [PDF] [DOI] [PubMed] [Scholar]

  102. Book Chapters |  Journal Articles |  Conference Proceedings ]

    Conference Proceedings

  103. Ekkekakis, P., & Lind, E. (2005). The dual-mode model of affective responses to exercise of varying intensities: A new perspective on the dose-response relationship. In T. Morris (Ed.), Proceedings of the 11th World Congress of Sport Psychology. Sydney, Australia: International Society of Sport Psychology. [PDF]

  104. Hall, E.E., Ekkekakis, P., & Petruzzello, S.J. (2005). Is the role of cognitive factors in exercise responses intensity-dependent? Extending the dual-mode model to perceived exertion. In T. Morris (Ed.), Proceedings of the 11th World Congress of Sport Psychology. Sydney, Australia: International Society of Sport Psychology. [PDF]

  105. Ekkekakis, P. (2003). Theoretical integration in the study of affective responses to acute exercise: The dual-mode model. In R. Stelter (Ed.), Proceedings of the XIth European Congress of Sport Psychology. Copenhagen, Denmark: Danish Forum of Sport Psychology. [PDF]

  106. Zervas, Y., Psychountaki, M., & Ekkekakis, P. (1999). Affective changes during and following acute aerobic exercise: Freely selected versus imposed levels of intensity. In V. Hosek, P. Tilinger, & L. Bilek (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th European Congress of Sport Psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 310-312). Prague, Czech Republic: European Federation of Sport Psychology.

  107. Ekkekakis, P., Kavouras, S.A., Casa, D.J., Herrera, J.A., Armstrong, L.E., Maresh, C.M., & Petruzzello, S.J. (1997). Affective responses to a bout of exhaustive exercise in the heat in dehydrated and rehydrated states: In search of physiological correlates. In R. Lidor & M. Bar-Eli (Eds.), Innovations in sport psychology: Linking theory and practice (Proceedings of the IX World Congress of Sport Psychology; vol. 1, pp. 253-255). Netanya, Israel: International Society of Sport Psychology. [PDF]

  108. Zervas, Y., Psychountaki, M., Stavrou, N., & Ekkekakis, P. (1997). The effects of physical education lessons on mood states of high school children. In R. Lidor & M. Bar-Eli (Eds.), Innovations in sport psychology: Linking theory and practice (Proceedings of the IX World Congress of Sport Psychology; vol. 2, pp. 785-787). Netanya, Israel: International Society of Sport Psychology.

  109. Ekkekakis, P., & Zervas, Y. (1993). The effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on mood: Co-examination of biological and psychological parameters in a controlled field study. In S. Serpa, J. Alves, V. Ferreira, & A. Paula-Brito (Eds.), Proceedings of the VIII World Congress of Sport Psychology (pp. 543-547). Lisbon, Portugal: International Society of Sport Psychology. [PDF]

  110. Zervas, Y., Ekkekakis, P., Emmanouel, K., Psychountaki, M., & Kakkos, V. (1993). The acute effects of increasing levels of aerobic exercise intensity on mood states. In S. Serpa, J. Alves, V. Ferreira, & A. Paula-Brito (Eds.), Proceedings of the VIII World Congress of Sport Psychology (pp. 620-624). Lisbon, Portugal: International Society of Sport Psychology. [PDF]

 

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